What’s the difference between the smell of a “political cadaver” in Latin America and the US ?

Bush in Colombia:

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Bush in Brasil:

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Bush in Guatemala:

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Bush in Uruguay:

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Note: Pics from the respective indymedia sites of each country.

And in case your missing the hilarious and deadly serious showdown between Bush and Chavez currently in South and Central America, Chavez called the president of the United States a ” political cadaver” and got thousands at a Buenos Aires rally to chant ” Gringo go home ! ”

And if you’re just tuning in you can read some of the news at Democracy Now, with an excerpt from the Chavez speech. And also today’s program has an in-depth analysis about Bush’s flailing 5-country Americas tour and the oh-s0-gritty details of imperial lunes.

So what’s the difference between the smell of the gringo- “political cadaver” in Latin America and the US ?

In the US, the smell of the gringo- “political cadaver” is still considered a national trade secret ingredient, passed on from franchise to franchise, where billions are “served”.

Happy Fast Food Nation on the Fast Track to deep-Fried Freedom, yum !

Interesting to note, on the US agenda for the southern hemisphere is an attempt to line up some support for ethanol production as an alternative to oil, which according to the Democracy Now report requires South American land, because the corn industry in the North cannot be sufficiently shifted ( a huge percent of the “food” products on the hyper-market shelf is a corn-product).
But the whole alternative/bio-fuels concept is deeply flawed, and as Carbusters Magazine in Prague reported in their last issue, the only solution ( from energy crisis to global warming) more likely involves rethinking car culture entirely. Read more from issue #27 : Fueling the Future or Feeding Our Obsession

BTw: Carbusters is available in the SF Bay Area at the Ecology Center in Berkeley.

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